Standard for information technology project management

Project Documentation Guidelines

Low-Risk Project Documentation
  • The goal is to communicate and document the essence of the project, primarily for informational purposes, both within the University and to outside stakeholders.
  • The Low-Risk Project Form provides a template for providing this information.
  • A low-risk project is typically described by a sentence or two of text in each of the sections of the form.
  • The level of detail in this documentation should be agreed upon mutually by the project manager and the project sponsor, with additional input and guidance as appropriate from the key project stakeholders.
Medium-Risk Project Documentation
  • Documentation for medium-risk projects should be more detailed than for low-risk projects and the level of detail should be commensurate with the complexity of the project in any case.
  • You are strongly encouraged to use project planning software, e.g., Microsoft Project, in assembling the project plan and schedule.
  • The project plan should include a Scope Plan, which includes the project objectives and the project deliverables, and which includes at least a simple Work Breakdown Structure.
  • The Resource and Staffing Plan should indicate clearly the resources to be used and should indicate key or required staff.
  • The Communication Strategy should articulate the extent and nature of communications involved in the project.
  • The Budget Plan should be appropriate to the needs of the Project Sponsor.
  • The Security Plan should identify anticipated security issues and indicate how they will be addressed.
  • The Testing Plan should be consistent with the complexity of the project and the associated risks.
  • A Training Plan, if appropriate, should outline plans for training of all anticipated and intended users.
High-Risk Project Documentation
  • Documentation for high-risk projects should provide all of the information required to initiate, plan, execute, monitor, and complete the project in a timely and cost-effective manner.
  • The documentation should follow the guidelines of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) of the Project Management Institute.
  • You are strongly encouraged to use project planning software, e.g., Microsoft Project, in assembling the project plan and schedule.
  • A detailed Scope Document should be included that clearly describes the project objectives and the project deliverables.
  • Plans for scope management should be provided and include procedures for change control.
  • The Resource and Staffing Plan should explain what resources (people, equipment, materials) and what quantities of each should be used to perform project activities, and it should provide a complete account of key or required staff.
  • The Communication Plan should describe the processes required to ensure timely and appropriate generation, collection, dissemination, storage, and ultimate disposition of project information.
  • The Budget Plan should be appropriate to the needs of the Project Sponsor and should provide a complete accounting of costs for staffing, equipment, software, supplies, consulting, and other costs. A life cycle cost or total cost of ownership, projected out at least 5 years, should be included.
  • The Security Plan should identify anticipated security issues and indicate how they will be addressed.
  • The Testing Plan should be consistent with the complexity of the project and the associated risks.
  • A Training Plan, if appropriate, should outline plans for training of all anticipated and intended users.